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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 2018 Elantra SE with the 2.0L L4 DOHC 16 Valve engine.

So far, I have driven just under 30,000 trouble free miles.


In general, I have found that the engine takes a little longer to get to the "normal" operating temperature compared to other vehicles I have owned. My previous vehicle was a 2010 Elantra.


Last night the temperature dipped to 16 degrees Farenheit and it took about 10 minutes of driving on the highway before the needle on temperature gauge reached the "normal" operating temperature. Of course, it also took some time before the cabin heater started blowing hot air.


My previous (2010) Elantra did not have a temperature gauge but I could always tell how warm the engine was by how "stiff" the engine felt and how warm the air was from the heater.


Any comments on this matter would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks,
JimBob
 

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The first suspect would be your thermostat is stuck open, or failed, assuming you have already confirmed the fluid levels are fine.


On another vehicle (non-hyundai) I had an air lock in the heater core that would send no cabin heat, regardless of the engine temp, but that's not your issue, as you said the gauge shows the engine is running cold.



As a check on the thermostat you can try putting cardboard in front of the rad. But really watch your heat gauge if you do that! I've never attempted this on a Hyundai, so not even aware if there is space to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The first suspect would be your thermostat is stuck open, or failed, assuming you have already confirmed the fluid levels are fine.


On another vehicle (non-hyundai) I had an air lock in the heater core that would send no cabin heat, regardless of the engine temp, but that's not your issue, as you said the gauge shows the engine is running cold.



As a check on the thermostat you can try putting cardboard in front of the rad. But really watch your heat gauge if you do that! I've never attempted this on a Hyundai, so not even aware if there is space to do so.
Thanks JohnYCannuck,

Fluid levels are fine and the thermostat is ok, thanks for mentioning those things.

I know someone who works for a Hyundai dealership and he spoke to the head mechanic about this "problem".
The takeaway for me was that the design of the vehicle lends itself to this condition and there is no known fix.

The engine/coolant does get warm eventually, it's just that it takes longer than it should, in my view. Nevertheless, it is something that I have decided to live with.

To mitigate any potential premature engine wear problems, I will be using full synthetic oil, especially during the cold winter months.

Thanks for your response, much appreciated.
 

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I have a 2017 and had the same issue... Their is a TSB that updates the ECM ..... When I was bring this issue up with the dealer, I was providing them with OBDII - PID data of the coolant temperature, and the issue was very pronounced when it was below freezing, and i tracked over my daily commute to work the coolant temp, outside temp, etc.. and the coolant temp would have huge temp swings... like 10-15 degC.. and took like 15 to 20 min to get upto normal 200DegC temp. The only limitation I was having was I had no access to the ECU ECT PID data (Electronic Control Thermostat) as I was wanting to see if the ECU was telling the thermostat to OPEN even if the cars coolant temp was not at 200DegC... But Hyundai did evently come out with a TSB and their is a software update to fix it..

The engine is tuned and controlled(ECU) for max efficiency.. I drive the same route every day, and drive with in the same style, and I saw no less or greater Liter/100km change.. but the heat and cabin heater core heated up a lot faster!.. and I did pull PID data and the temp rose much after and had very little temp swings like before..


Thanks JohnYCannuck,

Fluid levels are fine and the thermostat is ok, thanks for mentioning those things.

I know someone who works for a Hyundai dealership and he spoke to the head mechanic about this "problem".
The takeaway for me was that the design of the vehicle lends itself to this condition and there is no known fix.

The engine/coolant does get warm eventually, it's just that it takes longer than it should, in my view. Nevertheless, it is something that I have decided to live with.

To mitigate any potential premature engine wear problems, I will be using full synthetic oil, especially during the cold winter months.

Thanks for your response, much appreciated.
 
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